Chesterfield Golf Club is a parkland course with two distinctly different halves, the front nine holes built predominantly on shale and the back nine on clay. Our clubhouse is superbly positioned with southwest views down the 10th and 18th holes to over 130 acres of mature woodland and rolling hills beyond.



The Club was founded in 1897 on land in Somersall Park, about 1 mile away as the crow flies from its present location in Walton which became its permanent home in December 1905 with an official opening taking place in January 1906. It was initially a 9-hole course which was extended to 18 holes in 1908, generally in the area currently occupied by the present first 9 holes. The land for the second 9 holes was purchased in 1936 and opened for play in 1939 together with the present clubhouse.

The front 9 rises and falls from the clubhouse without being too taxing. A gentle, uphill par 4 opening hole is followed by a downhill 2nd and a fairly flat 3rd, both of which exceed 420 yards from the medal tees. The 4th and 5th are both uphill before crossing over the 1st fairway to the long, downhill par 3 6th hole. The 7th continues gently downwards turning left against the prevailing slope of the fairway. Through the trees to the 8th, a very picturesque par 3 hole of around 150 yards. The 9th hole is our first par 5, turning all the way to the left with the beckoning Halfway House behind the green as a target line for your second, or maybe third, shot.

The Halfway House provides a welcome five-minute break while the 10th fairway clears ahead of you. With an offering of pasties, bacon cobs and cakes together with tea, coffee and soft drinks, there’s generally something to refresh everyone in readiness for the second 9 holes which is an altogether flatter, and perhaps more demanding, affair. Throughout the back 9 holes there is evidence of this part of the course being used as agricultural land with ridge and furrow ploughing effects still very noticeable.

All but one of the second nine holes crosses the very pretty Birdholme Brook as it meanders through the course. Starting with our signature hole, the 10th plays downhill towards the brook which it crosses some 30 yards short of the green. The 11th is a fairly straightforward par 5 with a slight turn from left to right and a very tricky entrance to the green in two shots. The 12th is a long par 3 which was recently the scene of great jubilation as our Head Professional, Shane Naisbett, scored his sixth hole-in-one during the retiring Professional’s Testimonial Day. Best of all, the hole was sponsored and a prize of £10,000 was Shane’s reward for a very sweetly struck 6 iron into a strong breeze. The 13th hole can be a beast, justifiably stroke index 1 at 453 yards, generally into the prevailing wind. A 5 or even a 6 on this hole is never a disgrace. The 14th doglegs sharply to the left after a stand of trees and, despite its length, is never an easy green to hit. The par 3 15th is another very pretty hole which does require accuracy as anything missing the green will be difficult to get up and down. The 16th is a shortish par 4 uphill hole that shouldn’t cause too many problems off a straight drive and the 17th plays back down the same hill (on a different fairway) and poses problems with two giant oak trees at the bottom that may block the line to the green, a stream to cross and a very sharp upslope in front of the green that rejects anything short.

The finishing hole is great. Slightly uphill towards the clubhouse all the way. It can be a two-shotter but you must be aware of the cross bunker around 80 yards short of the green and of the very distinct McKenzie green. If you finish on the front there is a great possibility of three or even four putting.

From the course up to the clubhouse for a drink and a snack whilst watching the trials and tribulations of other golfers on the 10th and 18th holes.

We have a well-equipped Pro’s shop and welcoming staff throughout with everyone willing to help you spend your money.

Overall we are a friendly and welcoming Club with reasonably pitched green fees, buggy and trolley hire and tee booking facilities. Visitors, Corporate Days and Visiting Parties are always by arrangement.

Chesterfield is an historic market town famous for its ‘Crooked Spire’ church and as the last resting place of George Stephenson, of ‘Rocket’ fame, who is buried in Holy Trinity church, close to the town centre. It lies some 3 miles from the eastern borders of the Peak District National Park and 10 miles from Chatsworth House with Haddon Hall and the market town of Bakewell in the same vicinity. A range of accommodation and eating houses in both urban and rural surroundings are available in and around the town.


Chesterfield Golf Club – Matlock Road, Walton, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, S42 7LA

Phone: 01246 279256   –   Email: secretary@chesterfieldgolfclub.co.uk   –   Web: www.chesterfieldgolfclub.co.uk


Feature

Gaudet Luce Golf Club

Gaudet Luce – Major host

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125 years – South Staffs GC

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